Category Archives: Tagines

Tagines

December 2021: The Kasbah Chronicles, a belated post

THE KASBAH CHRONICLES
GOOD BYE 2021

FOR A BON REVEILLON
NEW YEAR’S EVE
and to
RING IN LA NOUVELLE ANNEE AT THE KASBAH

MINT TEA WILL GIVE WAY TO
A CHAMPAGNE TOAST
with several glasses of effervescent
Crémant d’Alsace

Derive inspiration from San Diego artists. What to they cook? Find out in this virtual, illustrated cookbook (yours truly contributed a recipe as well.)
Says Patrica Frischer, founder and coordinator of this project: “I have great pleasure in sending you this link to the first ever San Diego Visual Arts Network (SDVAN) cookbook.” Please take a look. It’s great fun and you will  be supporting the arts in San Diego. You can download the full cookbook below.
https://www.sdvisualarts.net/sdvan_new/

For dessert: My light-as-a-cloud Passion Fruit Mousse
My fig tree is bare, and so is the persimmon.The citrus trees are taking their restorative winter nap. Yet, much to my delight, at barely six months old, my passion fruit vine is not only taking over our pergola, but it is loaded with fruit. In December! Shiny green globes hang like Christmas ornaments from the vine’ s tentacular limbs. Ripeness turns them shades of deep purple, before the fruit falls to the ground.  Here is the recipe I included in my book,Edible Flowers: A Kitchen Companion.

 

Passion Fruit Mousse
Mousse au fruit de la Passion

Makes six ½ cup servings

Light and lovely!

Passionflower (Passiflora species and cultivars), a native of Brazil, was named when missionaries and early Spanish explorers to Central America saw the stunning blossoms as symbols of the Passion of Christ.  The passionflower came to represent the crown of thorns. Its ten petals symbolized the Apostles present at the Crucifixion, its three styles (threadlike female parts that are pollinated) the hammers used to drive the nails piercing Christ’s hands and feet, and its five anthers the wounds He suffered. In season, the vines are laden with magnificent flowers in an exquisite array of colors. Passiflora alata yields a gorgeous blossom, ideal for a beautiful garnish.

1 envelope (1/4 ounce) unflavored gelatin
1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon sugar (or more to taste)
3 eggs, separated
1 cup passion fruit juice
1/2 pint heavy whipping cream, whipped
Passionflowers for garnish

In a medium saucepan set in a pan of simmering water, or in the top of a double boiler, mix gelatin with sugar.
In a small bowl, whip egg yolks with passion fruit juice.  Pour liquid into sugar mixture and cook, stirring, until mixture thickens enough to coat the back of a wooden spoon.  Remove from heat and transfer to a medium bowl.  Refrigerate 40 to 50 minutes or until gelatin attains consistency of thick custard.
Meanwhile, beat egg whites until stiff peaks form.
In another bowl, beat whipping cream until soft peaks form. When gelatin has cooled, fold in beaten egg whites until thoroughly blended, then gently fold in whipped cream.  At this point transfer mousse to a large serving bowl or 8 individual parfait glasses.  Chill, and top with a fresh passionflower before serving.

NOTE: To make fresh juice, slice the ripe passion fruit in half and scoop the insides into a fine-mesh sieve set over a bowl.  With a wooden spoon, press as much juice as possible through the sieve. Discard seeds and pulp. For this recipe, you may need up to a dozen fruit, depending upon the variety.

Next issue:
Looking ahead to new beginnings, new books, and a NEW YEAR.

Thank you for being such faithful readers as The Kasbah Chronicles enters it s13th year.
Incroyable!

Comme toujours, as always,

Bismillah and Bon Appétit,

kitty
e-mail: darzitoun02@yahoo.com
info@mintteaandminarets.com
https://www.kittymorse.com

Kitty in the media: See my story on Baja Whales Here: www.winedineandtravel.com

A free cookbook!

I have great pleasure in sending you this link to the first ever SDVAN
cookbook. We are very grateful to you for supporting SDVAN in this way.
Please take a look at this link.

https://www.sdvisualarts.net/sdvan_new/pdf/NewNormal.pdf

Edible Flowers in the San Diego Union Tribune Food Section

In the San Diego Union Tribune

Dec. 16, 2015

Lavender Shortbread cookies

View the recipe and a mouth watering photo here:

Shortbread blossoms with lavender

or

http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/2015/dec/15/shortbread-blossoms-with-lavender/

San Diego Living Show, Channel 6, NOV. 2015

This link to San Diego’s Channel 6, the CW, San Diego Living should be accessible until December 2015, I hope.

It was great fun on sandiego6.com

Monday, November 9, 2015

San Diego Living, 9AM

Mint Tea and Minarets

http://www.sandiego6.com/san-diego-living

Please insert the link in your browser if you can’t access it here.

It is worth it! Heather, from Channel 6, was a most gracious host. We had fun!

 

Recipes from San Diego Living, SD Channel 6, Nov. 9th, 2015 TV appearance

November 9, 2015

 

From Mint Tea and Minarets: a Banquet of Moroccan Memories

(La Caravane, 2013)

Egg Tagine with Olives

Serves 4

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 medium onions, very finely diced

1 (14¼-ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained

½ teaspoon sugar

10 green or purple olives, rinsed, pitted, and coarsely chopped

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 bay leaf

8 eggs

1 tablespoon chopped cilantro

2 teaspoons ground cumin

1 tablespoon mashed preserved lemon pulp (optional)

Freshly ground pepper

Fresh cilantro leaves for garnish

BAGUETTE slices, for serving

 

In a tagine or medium skillet, heat olive oil over medium heat. Cook onions, stirring occasionally, until light brown, 8 to 10 minutes. Add tomatoes, sugar, olives, garlic, and bay leaf. Mash lightly with a fork. Reduce heat to low and simmer until tomatoes thicken somewhat, 15 to 20 minutes. Discard bay leaf. Set aside half of this mixture for garnish.

In a bowl, beat eggs, cilantro, cumin, preserved lemon pulp, and pepper. Add to tomato mixture. Cook, stirring gently, until eggs are not quite set. Garnish with the reserved tomato mixture and cilantro. Serve immediately with crusty bread.


 From Cooking at the Kasbah: Recipes from my Moroccan Kitchen (Chronicle Books, 1999)

now in its  tenth printing

Cassolita

Moroccan Squash with Caramelized Onions

(serves 4)

 

1 lb Mediterranean pumpkin or butternut squash

2 large onions, thinly sliced

1/4 C olive oil

2 tsp ground cinnamon

2 T sugar

Salt and pepper to taste

1/2 C raisins, plumped in warm water and drained

1/4 C slivered almonds, toasted

 

Place unpeeled squash in baking dish and bake at 350 degrees F until soft, about 1 hour. Let cool. Peel and cut into serving pieces and place in baking dish.

 

Cook the onions in the oil, with the cinnamon, sugar, salt, and pepper, until very soft, about 15 minutes. Add the raisins and cook 5 minutes longer. Spread the mixture over the squash, cover with foil, and return to the oven to heat for 20 minutes.

The Kasbah Chronicles/Tagine of Quince

 

October 2011

 

Nothing surprised me more two or three years ago, than to learn from one of my “foodie” cousins in Paris, that “Alloween” (with silent "h", sic) had taken root in France. Dozens of sites initiated novices to la soirée d’Halloween, from cooking sites featuring cupcakes called “les caries de la sorcière” (the witch’s cavities) to other web pages giving step by step directions on how to carve your “citrouille” (pumpkin). Go to [1]http://www.2travelandeat.com/France) if curiosity gets the better of you!

 

Meanwhile: In the Moroccan kitchen!

IN SEASON: QUINCE!

 

Purchasing a quince is a great way to start up a conversation at the farmer’s market. Questions range from “What is this funny looking fruit?" to "What do you make with it?”

 

"Membrillo (quince paste), or quince jelly!" might be the input of Hispanic and Italian cooks. In Morocco, the seasonal appearance of “sfergel” (as quince is called in local darija dialect) is cause for rejoicing. Bouchaib, the cook/caretaker at our family riad, Dar Zitoun, couldn’t wait to head for the souk to purchase the first sfergel. Our dear friend passed away a few years ago, and in his memory, I offer you the dish he used to prepare. This tagine is an adaptation from the one featured in my first cookbook, Come with me to the Kasbah: A Cook’s Tour of Morocco.

 



Tagine of Rabbit with Quince

Tagine de Lapin aux Coings

Serves 4

 

Sweet “pineapple” quince is the variety most commonly available in the United States. You can substitute chicken legs and thighs for the rabbit.

 

2 quinces

½ cup honey

2 teaspoons cinnamon

3 tablespoons olive oil

2 teaspoons turmeric

3 pounds rabbit, cut up

2 onions diced

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 cup broth or reserved quince cooking liquid

2 teaspoons salt

1/2 cup honey

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

 

Core (do not peel), remove seeds, and cut quinces into fairly thick wedges. Place in a bowl of acidulated water to prevent darkening. Drain.

 

Transfer quince to a saucepan over medium heat, and barely cover fruit with water. Add honey and cinnamon. Cook until quinces are tender. Drain, reserving liquid.

 

Meanwhile, in a tagine dish placed over a heat diffuser, or in a medium casserole, heat olive oil and turmeric over medium-high heat. Cook,

stirring, until spices begin to foam. Add rabbit pieces and stir to coat, 4 to 5 minutes. Add onions and garlic. Cook, stirring 2 to 3 minutes. Add broth (or quince cooking liquid) and salt. Cover and reduce heat to medium. Cook until rabbit is tender, 50 to 55 minutes.

 

With a slotted spoon transfer rabbit to a serving dish and keep warm. Transfer cooked quince to pan, and bring sauce to a simmer on top of the stove. It

should be quite sweet. Add honey, if desired. Season with pepper. Cook until sauce thickens, 6 to 8 minutes.

 

To serve, mound rabbit on a platter, and top with the sauce and wedges of quince (the photo above shows how carefully Bouchaib used to “carve” the

fruit!) Serve with crusty bread.


Reminder:

Join me for the webchats (see my previous post), if you can!

 

JOYEUSE FETE D'(H)alloween!