Category Archives: Media Room

Kitty’s newspaper and radio interviews, television appearances, blog chats

Tune in to Heritage Radio to listen in on an interview of Kitty with Cathy Erway, Host of Eat Your Words
Heritage radio Network
e-mail: info@heritageradionetwork.com
Monday April 7th, 9AM Pacific time

The Kasbah Chronicles: October 2021 C’est l’Halloween!

The Kasbah Chronicles
Les Chroniques de la Kasbah
In English and en français
Now it its 13th year
C’est la 13ième année!
 A FIERY SUNRISE IN VISTA
VIVE l’HALLOWEEN

The French have adopted our custom. C’est vraiment too much!
Even in my mother’s hometown of Châlons-en-Champagne
http://www.lhebdoduvendredi.com/article/41646/programme-mortelpour-challoween

MUSINGS

My literary trip to New England
Notes on my upcoming cookbook
Recipe: a repeat for Thanksgiving
My Algerian great-grandmother’s cassolita
Links of interest
Idiotismes Gastronomiques: brush up on your French idioms
A new farm stand: From the exclusive Golden Door Spa
Moroccan items for sale

MUSINGS:
It has been a month since I returned from a literary tour to New England to view the leaves turning in Massachusets, Maine, Vermont, and New Hampshire. As usual, my friend and colleague Susan McBeth, founder of Adventures by the Book (https://adventuresbythebook.com) had pulled out all the stops. Our 9-day tour flew by, with a private tour of  Beacon Hill homes in Boston, a magical evening inside the city’s legendary Athenaeum library,

visit with local authors, and visit to the homes of major American literary figures such as the home Little Women and Louisa May Alcott, chez Longfellow in Portland, ME, Thoreau’s farmhouse digs, and Robert Frost’s enchanted forest and tree-lined Poetry Trail.

 

A thrill for me was to “visit” my book, Edible Flowers: A Kitchen Companion, on display in the gift shop of at the quirky and awe-inspiring Isabella Stewart Museum in Boston. I love finding my books in such famous “homes.”

https://www.gardnermuseum.org

Boston has discovered fish tacos (so has Paris, by the way…but that is another story.)

One of my quests? To eat as many lobster rolls as possible. I am happy to report I overdosed.

We did see the leaves turn, we walked under a covered bridge, and we ate more  lobster rolls. Oh yes! We even went on a lobster fishing expedition near Kennebunkport, ME. Good news: the lobster catch this year is excellent. Lobsters have returned to the waters of New England.

One of the most unusual items I discovered along the way is this Moroccan Rose and Grapefruit flavored vodka—in the wilds of Vermont. Really? Tasted like pure vodka to me!
https://www.smugglersnotchdistillery.com/spirits/moroccan-rose-and-grapefruit-flavored-vodka/ In Jeffersonville VT
Smugglers’ Notch Distillery® is a father/son partnership in Jeffersonville, Vermont. The distillery was founded in 2006 at the foot of the famed Smugglers’ Notch, site of many a clandestine bootlegger’s run through this rugged Vermont mountain pass.

Recipe: Cassolita

(I will spare you a repeat of comedian Art Buchwald’s column on Le Jour de Merci Donnant (where he explains Thanksgiving to the French, but I still think it’s hilarious!) And cassolita is the perfect side dish for turkey

Kitty’s Cassolita
Moroccan Squash with Caramelized Onions
(serves 4)
 

1 lb Mediterranean pumpkin or butternut squash
2 large onions, thinly sliced
1/4 C vegetable oil
2 tsp ground cinnamon
2 T sugar
Salt and pepper to taste
1/2 C raisins, plumped in warm water and drained
1/4 C slivered almonds, toasted

Place unpeeled squash in baking dish and bake at 350 degrees F until soft, about 1 hour. Let cool. Peel and cut into serving pieces and place in baking dish.

Cook the onions in the oil, with the cinnamon, sugar, salt, and pepper, until very soft, about 15 minutes. Add the raisins and cook 5 minutes longer. Spread the mixture over the squash, sprinkle with the almonds, cover with foil, and return to the oven to heat for 20 minutes.
PS: This can be made a day ahead.

Closer to home:
https://spectatorworld.com/life/avocado-angst-safe-eat/

Where have the avocados gone? Quelle tristesse, où sont passés les avocats (fruits, pas les hommes?)
Not avocados as well! What’s left to eat in this diet crazy world! I live a few miles from the avocado capital of the world: Fallbrook, CA. Have they heard the news?? Their avocado festival draws 100,000 visitors each year. No guacamole in my life? Are you kidding? Where does that leave tacos, chiles rellenos and Superbowl dips??

Roi du chocolat:
The world’s future king of chocolate lives close by, in San Marcos, CA. Bonne chance!
https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/communities/north-county/san-marcos/story/2021-10-13/san-diegos-surfing-chef-christophe-rull-crowned-americas-chocolate-king

Teslas in my maman’s home town of Châlons-en-Champagne. It’s fun to follow the news of the town where my mother was born, and where my maternal great-parents lived until the mid-1920s. I have been steeped in THEIR lives for the past 18 months—from the Belle Epoque to the end of WW2, through their own handwritten legacy: a daily journal and 70 family recipes. A gut-wrenching project. What would be their reaction upon this latest mode of transportation?
http://www.lhebdoduvendredi.com/article/41543/les-vehicules-electriques-de-tesla-bientot-a-chalons

Edible Flowers: A Kitchen Companion has also found a home at the beautiful Sherman Library and Botanical Gardens in Corona del Mar, CA. An ideal time to visit is during the holidays.
https://thesherman.org

Discovery of the month: Idiotismes gastronomiques: 
I stumbled upon the most brilliant Wikipedia page called idiotismes gastronomiques. https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_d%27idiotismes_gastronomiques_fran%C3%A7ais
Francophones and francophiles, you need to read this to enrich your knowledge of French idioms and  penetrate the French soul. So many terms of endearment and insults have to do with food:
Do you belong to le gratin, better yet, le gratin parisien? The Parisian upper class? Not I!
 
Tu n’es pas dans ton assiette ? You are not in your plate? Are you not feeling well??
 
Mon bout de chou: my little piece of cabbage, is what my mother used as a term of endearment
 
Prendre de la bouteille, to acquire the bottle, applies to all of us : it means to grow old! It goes with prendre de la brioche, to acquire some brioche…to gain weight.
 
My father was always guilty of this:
Appuyer sur le champignon, to push on the mushroom, or push on the gas pedal.
 
And Elle a bu le bouillon d’onze heures…she drank the broth of the eleventh hour…the potion which will send her to the next world.


Bismillah and Bon Appétit and
UN BON L”HALLOWEEN…

PS: I am still downsizing and getting rid of a number of vintage and antique Moroccan artifacts.  Please send me an email if you would like to view the items before the holidays.

The Kasbah Chronicles: Valentine’s edition 2021

MUSINGS

The Kasbah Chronicles

Les Chroniques de la Kasbah

 

Happy Valentine’s DAY

Bonne Fête de Saint Valentin

In Praise of CENTENARIANS

Kitty in the media:

WineDineandTravel magazine: California’s historic HIGHWAY 395

Podcast with Kitty: Moroccan cuisine: an overview

Classes and presentations

 

Links of interest

News of Morocco and beyond

Moroccan items for sale

 

MUSINGS:

     I perch on the edge of another momentous birthday, I need to salute two centenarians in my life: Flor, my mother’s first cousin, who reached this milestone last August—and whose voice sounds as lively today as that of an 18-year-old’s; and Irene, who has reached 103 and was one of the very first passengers to join me on my gastronomic tour along the Kasbah Trail three decades ago. What role models!

Covid and confined — with a BIG difference: My husband and I got our first dose of the vaccine. Funny how a weight has been lifted from our shoulders—even though we need a second dose.

The confinement has not put halt to my work. I am knee-deep in family history spanning WWI and WWII—recipes from Alsace-Lorraine included, bien sûr.

My thoughts return to last year at this time: I was in heaven petting the whales in Baja California and making snowballs in Baja’s sierra. That trip has kept my wanderlust at bay for the past 12 months, but enough already!

Je voudrais saluer deux amies centenaires : cousine Flor, qui a passé le cap en août dernier, et Irene, qui va avoir 103 ans! Toutes deux dignes de ma profonde admiration.

GROSSE différence entre ce mois de confinement et mes dernières Chroniques : mon mari et moi avons finalement obtenu la première dose du vaccin. Si vous regardez les nouvelles, vous savez que les USA ont été lents à démarrer. J’espère que les choses se sont mieux passées chez vous. On respire mieux, mais à 6 pieds de distance! Heureusement que l’an dernier à cette date, j’ai pu aller au Mexique, en Californie du Sud caresser les baleines !

Virtual presentations:

Spices in Moroccan cooking

Friday, Feb. 26, 2021

2-3:30PM

FREE

Registration required

Coronado Public Library (and it is a beautiful one!)

The use of cumin in tagines and other Moroccan dishes. This is a great program sponsored by the library called Spice it Up, Coronado! FREE! But you need to register.

https://live-coronado.pantheonsite.io/events/february-spice-it-coronado

Facebook and Instagram:

https://www.facebook.com/CoronadoPublicLibrary/

Kitty in the media:

WineDineandTravelmagazine.com

Looking for a sort of STAYCATION (nouveau mot à la mode: en vacances près de chez soi.)

Un autre voyage très sympa en janvier 2020.

Here is my article on California’s Highway 395—a slice of historic California

https://winedineandtravelmagazine.com/wdt/calcoast/

Kitty and a Podcast:

Moroccan cuisine: influences and history

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sX-WfB9r00U.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zC7_bInxIfE.

Apricots in Silicon Valley even rate their own museum: Abricots de Silicon Valley.

https://heritageparkmuseum.org/sample-page/orchard-heritage-park

Il ne faut pas oublier qu’avant de devenir le paradis des techies, Silicon Valley était couverte d’arbres fruitiers notamment des meilleurs abricotiers du pays.

I was thrilled to read the article on apricots, and had to share my apricot adventures in Silicon Valley. I visited several farmers in late 1999—among them the famous Mariani orchards in Morgan Hill, CA. Andy Mariani, who is still in business, is one of this country most knowledgeable stone fruit experts (https://andysorchard.com.) (They ship!) He shared a recipe for The California Farm Cookbook (Kitty Morse, Pelican Publishing).

CALIFORNIA APRICOTS: A History (and a recipe)

Mariani Orchards’ Apricot-Amaretto Sandwiches

“On our family farm,” says Andy Mariani of Mariani Orchards, “autumn is a favorite time of the year.”  The tall, dark-haired, and soft-spoken Andy is proud to carry on the family tradition–one begun by his forefathers who originated in Vis, an island off the Dalmatian Coast.  The senior Mariani began farming in California in 1932, finally settling in the idyllic Morgan Hill area of the Santa Clara Valley–the perfect location to grow plump apricots and sweet cherries.   Andy’s brothers and sisters help in the running of the orchard as well as in the ever-expanding mail-order business.  “Fruit grown elsewhere in California doesn’t seem to have the sweetness ours do,” says Andy, who credits the high quality of the Mariani fruit to the proximity of the ocean, and to a cool growing season.  The delicious result of the Mariani’s labors is evident when biting into the oversized, dried Blenheim apricots which they use to make their superb Apricot Amaretto-Sandwiches.

Marzipan OR almond paste (available in supermarkets or specialty food stores)

Almond extract or Amaretto liqueur

Jumbo, dried Mariani apricots to suit

Guittard A’peels dipping chocolate (#9760)

If using marzipan, which is sweeter than almond paste, use a few drops of almond extract or Amaretto to cut sweetness.  Roll marzipan or almond paste into a log shape, until it reaches the same diameter as the apricot half.  Cut round patties about 1/4″ in width.  To assemble sandwich, trim apricot half to perfect circle on sheet of wax paper.  Place almond paste patty on top, and cover with second apricot half.  Squeeze slightly so filling adheres to apricot.  Trim to size.  If smaller sandwich is preferred, simply cut in half.  For extra special treat, dip sandwich in melted chocolate.  Let cool on wax paper.  Store in airtight container until ready to eat.

Note:  Almond paste is available in bulk from large bakeries.  Commercial marzipan found in supermarkets tends to be very sweet.  Guittard A’peels dipping chocolate #9760 is specially formulated to stick to dried fruit.  You can order the 2″ wide jumbo apricots directly from the Marianis.

Flashback to Mint Tea and Minarets: a banquet of Moroccan memories, and our historic medina of Azemmour.

Azemmour vu du ciel 2020 Nous vous proposons des vues d’Azemmour comme vous ne les avez jamais vu.

https://youtu.be/CTMLXL2rxg0

Speaking of COVID:

https://laquotidienne.ma/article/actualites-economiques/covid-19-le-premier-scanner-de-depistage-au-maroc-et-en-afrique-installe-a-casablanca United Imaging Healthcare (UIH), grand acteur international dans le domaine des équipements médicaux, a introduit le tout premier système de dépistage Covid-19 en Afrique.

Did you know ?
French in Africa: French is the official language of 21 countries in Africa. (They don’t mention North Africa, but they should!

Nouveau mot de vocabulaire:

New FRENCH WORD: OVER THE TOP !!! I leave it up to you to translate.

Un afterwork au bureau, des amis à la maison, une envie d’Alsace, un match de football, basket ou rugby…

Received from Morocco: I love the spellings…« le nouveau président (djo baidn donc bay bay korona »

Bon appétit! A la prochaine!

Kitty

The Kasbah Chronicles: October November 2020

These seals at Oceanside Harbor have the right idea: Wake me up when COVID is over…

MUSINGS

The Kasbah Chronicles

Les Chroniques de la Kasbah

In English and en français

Musings

Notes on my next cookbook

A new twist on a Moroccan classic

Links of interest

News of Morocco and beyond

Improve your spoken French!

Moroccan items for sale

Musings:

In this, the ninth month of the COVID pandemic, I am at a loss for words. I cannot complain, since our Vista Kasbah is the best place for me to be sequestered—but boy, am I getting itchy feet. Yet, the idea of getting on an airplane still does not appeal to me.

Actually, the pandemic has served an exciting purpose: I have been hard at work on my next book, Bitter Sweet: legacy from my Alsatian ancestors (working title). Beautiful food photography included too!

I received an email blast from the High Atlas Foundation, a most worthy NGO in Morocco :

https://mailchi.mp/highatlasfoundation/article-reviving-a-monastery-for-community-development?e=4GUbJ49kBE. Unpublished article on Tioumliline by Lamia Radi, Rabat, Morocco.

Toumliline remains a magical name in my mind. Toum as we all called it, was a refuge for Catholic nuns in the Middle Atlas Mountains. It was a popular destination and Catholic retreat for many of my Catholic friends, especially at Easter:

“On part a Toum….” they would announce… each year.

Those among you who accompanied me to Morocco will remember the longest day of the trip as we crossed the Atlas Mountains from Fez to the oasis of Tinehrir. Half way up, Tioum hides among the forest of cedar trees not far from the snow slopes of the Mishliffen. Macaques on the way to Toum…

The very first avocado from our very own tree..

 

Let’s head to the kitchen

 new twist on egg tagine with lox

Morocco meets Brooklyn

(variations in Cooking at the Kasbah, The Vegetarian Table: North Africa and Mint Tea and Minarets.)

do you get the idea I love this egg dish?!!

Egg Tagine with Olives and lox

Serves 4

Make the tomato chermoula sauce ahead of time:

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 medium onions, very finely diced

1 (14¼-ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained

½ teaspoon sugar (optional)

10 green or purple olives, rinsed, pitted, and coarsely chopped

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 bay leaf

¼ cup minced cilantro

In a tagine or medium skillet, heat olive oil over medium heat. Cook onions, stirring occasionally, until golden, 8 to 10 minutes. Add tomatoes, sugar, olives, garlic, and bay leaf. Mash lightly with a fork. Reduce heat to low and simmer until tomatoes thicken somewhat, 15 to 20 minutes. Discard bay leaf. Add cilantro.

Adapted from Mint Tea and  Minarets: a banquet of Moroccan memories.

For ONE person:

One egg, beaten

1 or 2 slices of lox, diced

Pour the egg in a small oiled skillet. Swirl around as for an omelet. Salt and pepper to taste. Top with 2 tablespoons of the chermoula, and diced salmon.

Copyright Kitty Morse 2020

More: The French are crazy about “crumbles” savory or sweet. Who knew that “crumbles” (and biscuits d’Halloween) would make such an impact?

Crumble de courgettes  au Parmesan

Serves 4

  • 4 T olive oil
  • 4 medium zucchini, peeled and sliced very thin
  • 4 T flour
  • 2 T bread crumbs (or almond meal)
  • 1 cup grated parmesan
  • Ground pepper to taste
  • 4 T butter, softened
  • 4 slices of ham or prosciutto (optional), cut into ribbons

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

Bring the oil to medium heat in a pan or skillet. Saute the zucchini slices until soft. Drain and set aside.

For the crumble, combine the flour, bread crumbs, parmesan, and salt. Add the softened butter and mix with your fingertips. Alternate layers of zucchini, and ham (if using) in a medium baking dish. Top with the crumble mixture and bake for 20 to 25 minutes.

My friend Stephenie Coug

hlin, owner of Seabreeze Farm in Del Mar (CA) a mere 2 or 3 miles from the ocean, grows and delivers her own GORGEOUS produce. Heck her out!

https://csa.farmigo.com/store/seabreezed

News of Morocco, France, and beyond:

Casablanca is undergoing a renewal, and hopefully a getting a good coat of paint. We lived on Avenue Hassan II, across from the park, one the city’s main arteries. This is what our building looked like in the earl 1920s…a beautiful Moorish art deco structure. it needs a new coat of paint in this century. Local casablancais have finally realized what an architectural treasure they have in downtown Casablanca..

https://aujourdhui.ma/culture/un-programme-de-mise-a-niveau-du-centre-ville-historique-de-casablanca-voit-le-jourIl+s’articule+autour+de+quatre+projets+Dans+le+cadre+du+plan+de+sauvegarde+et+de+valorisation+du+patrimoine+de+Casablanca,+la+Société+de+développement+local+Cas :

MOROCCAN ITEMS FOR SALE:
PLEASE VIEW DEDICATED PAGE ON THIS WEBSITE

Bellows, camel leather, copper and wood. ABout 48 years old.. Works fine.

 

All these will appear on my dedicated page.

These lithographs were produced by he same printer who printed my first book, Come with me to the Kasbah. Printer and publishing house are long gone

I am asking USD70 a piece. Shipped in a tube. About 23.5 by 15. 5 inches.

,

Wine Dine and Travel, award-winning emagazine

In addition to writing cookbooks, I have long written travel features focusing on foods of all sorts, from how to make couscous in the style of Casablanca, to food markets around the globe. Truth be told, my favorite pastime, wherever I am,  is to meet local growers and producers, be it farmers, ranchers, or cheese makers everywhere I travel. Gathering wheat for making couscous in Morocco; exploring Adelaide’s (Australia) bustling Central Market; savoring Chile’s acclaimed mussels on the island of Chiloe; taste-testing (!!) cava (champagne) and oysters in l’Ampolla, Spain; grazing through Barcelona’s famed La Boqueria; and eating Cuba’s iconic ropa vieja. . This passion began decades ago when I wrote a weekly column titled “In Season” for the San Diego edition of the Los Angeles Times–My agricultural education lasted two and a half years, starting with the first ever farmer’s market in San Diego County, the granddaddy of them all Vista Farmer’s market (held in the parking lot of our library in the very early 1980s, with just 18 farmers, many retired military. My “farm” experts then were the managers and market co-founders, wonderful and generous Dick and Margo Bauman, both now deceased. The LA Times left San Diego, and that only inspired me to continue seeking farmers around the state, and to write The California Farm Cookbook (Pelican Publishing, 1994). For the next year or so, I sought out and visited with dozens of farmers long before Farm to Table became overused  buzzwords.

More recently, this GORGEOUS Internet magazine  allows me to resume my path: Wine Dine and Travel magazine (http://www.winedineandtravel.com), an award-winning quarterly that features wine, dining, and globe trotting! I am now a staff writer. Here are links  to my articles.

Our most Excellent Cuba Adventure (Fall 2020)

Morocco’s Kasbah Trail (Spring 2020), my favorite itinerary in Morocco

THE KASBAH TRAIL

Barcelona’s La Boqueria Market (2020)

http://online.anyflip.com/dmdy/tzrk/mobile/index.html#p=105

A Vietnamese paradise for foodies: the ancient city of Hoi An: Discovering Argentina issue, p. 236

http://anyflip.com/bookcase/duev

 

 

 

The Kasbah Chronicles: July 2020

A PERSONAL MILESTONE
Under Confinement
 50 years and counting!


Then

Now
Our confined celebration!

NO Travels (except on paper)
My oyster binge in L’AMPOLLA, Spain
California’s Historic Highway 395

 
Classes and presentations via ZOOM
A virtual cooking class with Spice and Leaf
 
Podcasts
Kitty chats with….
 
My NEW project
A new, family cookbook
 
News of Morocco and beyond
 
Links of interest
Despite all my good intentions, these  Chronicles are about 6 weeks late.  How can time fly by so fast when we are confined? As my mother used to say:
“C’est toujours vendredi.. It is always Friday.”  So:

HAPPY (BELATED) FOURTH OF JULY!

The ongoing confinement and the subsequent Black Lives Matter protests brought to mind  the  “Long Hot Summer of 1967” race riots when America was once before in turmoil. I was confined to my apartment with my roommate for 4 days, while the inner cities of Milwaukee, Chicago, and Detroit were going up in flames. This was my first introduction to political unrest in the US, and it was an eye-opener.

The past weeks brought a sense of heartbreaking déjà vu at this turning point in our nation’s history. I remain a (grateful immigrant) optimist.

Memories of a 1967 confinement:
One outcome of my 1967 confinement: we avoided hunger pangs with cans of tuna fish (my cooking career evolved long after the riots!) Thanks to my wonderful American roommate, Ann, I discovered the subtle “delights” of tuna casserole: a basic white sauce, a can of tuna and a few frozen peas and voilà: a great topping for boiled rice!  What a taste discovery! After 4 days confined to our first-floor walk-up, the casserole attained the rank of comfort food for me, although it will never top couscous in the style of Casablanca, or my French grandmother’s purée de pomes de terre (mashed potatoes)!
 
The present confinement reactivated my culinary juices. I finally put pen to paper with an idea that I had been harboring for some time: a cookbook combining family history with recipes from Alsace Lorraine, my mother’s birthplace (much like The Scent of Orange Blossoms, which featured my North African ancestry). Among the French documents I inherited, I uncovered the journal of my great grand-father, a French army doctor who served during WWI, and hand written recipes from his wife, my great-grandmother, who died at the hands of the Nazis just before the end of WWII. So what is a cookbook author to do? Immerse myself in cuisine bourgeoise de famille, and test and cook. Cook and test.
NO title yet…STAY TUNED!

Le confinement me pousse à cuisiner–très à propos car parmi les papiers de famille de ma mère, j’ai retrouvé des documents relatifs à ses grand-parents alsaciens–qui malheureusement ont disparu sous l’occupation nazie. J’ai donc hérité de photos, de documents de famille–et d’une centaine de recettes écrites à la main par mon arrière grandmère,  typiques du Grand Est–en particulier de Châlons sur Marne maintenant appelée Châlons en Champagne, ville natale de ma mère. Que faire de ce trésor familial sinon écrire un livre en leur souvenir?  choucroute, baekhopf, bredele (Alsatian cookies) et bien plus. Plus de détails à venir…
 
Mon but ce mois ci est d’écouler les bottes de chou friséMy present challenge is to cook with the bunches and bunches of kale and chard obtained from April Viles at  SandnStraw Farm in Vista (CA). The farm stand is opened 2 days a week. Check out their website www.sandnstraw.com
Here are two recipes I developed:
Chard and Garbanzo Bean Hummus (Hummus au chou frisé et pois chiches):
1 (14-ounce) can garbanzo beans, drained
1 cup COOKED and chopped chard
2 teaspoons cumin
Salt and pepper to taste
A squeeze of lemon juice
¼ cup chopped cilantro
Sun dried tomatoes optional)
 
Blend all ingredients together, and voilà, chard hummus
 
Kitty’s Curried Chard and Zucchini Soup
Velouté de Courgettes au curry et chou frisé

Serves 4
I serve this hot or cold, depending on the season.
 Prepare this a few hours ahead of time, and refrigerate.
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 small onion, diced (or leeks)
4 small zucchini, peeled and diced (courgettes)
1 cup COOKED, drained, and chopped CHARD and Kale!!!
1 small potato, peeled and diced
1 teaspoons mild curry powder
½ teaspoon salt
1 ½ cups chicken broth
½ cup plain nonfat yogurt
Chopped parsley or cilantro, for garnish
 
In a skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the onion, zucchini, chard, and potato. Sprinkle with the curry powder. Lightly brown the vegetables, stirring occasionally. Turn heat down to medium low. Cover and cook until vegetables are soft. Adjust curry powder and salt. Let cool.

Place half the vegetables  in a blender or food processor. Add half the broth and half the yogurt. Blend until very smooth. Repeat the process until all the vegetables are used. Transfer to a bowl and refrigerate. Sprinkle with herbs, and serve.

Feedback: Thank you!
Hi Kitty,
I thought you would like to know that I tried your husband Owen’s recipe.  I love Costco’s scallops…always a good quick meal.  And, of course, I sear them. So I cut them up (frozen) into about 6 pieces each, sauteed them in butter, added lemon juice and white wine, salt and pepper, let them caramelize, and put them on top of a large salad (with avocados).  (Steak salad without the steak:) It was delicious!  Owen rocks!. . .
Best regards,
Janet


Just for you, a tall glass of freshly squeezed blood orange juice from our very own blood orange tree: Un verre de jus de sanguine?


Kitty in the media: PODCAST a new experience for me:
https://www.buzzsprout.com/990508 
My host, Jessica, explained:
“I wanted this episode (the very first!) to be about Sephardic food in North Africa and to get to know you better (and your love of cilantro!) Jessica, A Jewish Convert Talks To A Global Community in her new blog..This is the link to my website, specifically the post about your wonderful cookbook, it was one of my first posts: https://newjewkitchen.com/the-scent-of-orange-blossoms/ I

Kitty’s recent published articles:
Staying put while roaming the globe before confinement:

California’s Historic Highway 395, along the eastern sierras.
https://www.creators.com/read/travel-and-adventure/06/20/us-highway-395-leads-back-into-california-history  
 
My oyster binge in L’Ampolla, Spain
https://www.creators.com/read/travel-and-adventure/06/20/catalonias-hidden-gem-the-delta-del-ebre

COMING UP:
Trinidad, Cuba
A night on the Queen Mary in Long Beach (CA)


Classes: ZOOM in on A virtual cooking class! 
JOIN ME for this Fun event:

Sunday, August 2, 4PM Pacific
www.spiceitupwithdeb.com. Please open the link to view the menu.
I will chat alongside my energetic friend Debbie Kornberg, on
Spice It Up with Deb: A Live Cooking Experience.

  • Pick your cooking class
  • Receive a list of ingredients and recipes.
  • Order your SPICE + LEAF products through AMAZON. 
  • Cook in your kitchen at the same time I am cooking in my kitchen all in real-time with guided instruction!
  • Explore the flavors of the world without having to leave your kitchen!
  • By the end of class, you will have a meal ready to serve.

Included in the class price is a copy of Edible Flowers: A Kitchen Companion
Reader Feedback:

Hi Kitty,
I got the books (Edible Flowers) today.  They are beautiful. I really love them more than I expected and I had very high expectations.  They are beyond beautiful and wonderful. So I put another check in the mail to you for two more books. . .”  Carole
 
Links of interest en français et en anglais:
site bilingue pour les français aux USA.

Frenchly.us and French Books
Frenchly is the premier website for Francophiles in the US and abroad, covering news, arts, culture, style, and all things French. Check out their French books:
https://frenchly.us/20-books-that-have-changed-french-lives/

Voyages en France tout en restant chez soi:
How about touring France from the comfort of home?

https://france-amerique.com/fr/the-best-virtual-tours-for-cooped-up-francophiles/?ct=t(France-Amerique-newsletter-28-june-2018_COPY_01)
 
Moroccan cookies anyone?
In time for the upcoming Feast of the Lamb (Aid el Fitr) or any celebration:
For the best mail order Moroccan cookies visit https://www.meskasweets.com. Made in New Jersey and shipped to you fresh. I guarantee you will not be disappointed!
From their website: “Our cookies are available in traditional variety as well as fusions with the trendiest flavors… As such we offer a Gluten Free Moroccan Macaron line with Organic Japanese Matcha Green Tea, Coffee… All of our treats are freshly made in NJ using the finest ingredients, have no preservatives and no GMO products. In addition to being delicious, our treats are Kosher (OU) Pareve.

Kitty still has copies of:
Shameless plug: If you have read any of the books, in English or en français, a review on the Amazon book site is always appreciated….

Min Tea and Minarets
https://www.amazon.com/Mint-Tea-Minarets-Moroccan-Memories/dp/0985216441/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=
Le Riad au Bord de l’Oued
https://www.amazon.com/Riad-Bord-lOued-souvenirs-saveurs-ebook/dp/B07YYLJX2K/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1
and Edible Flowers: A Kitchen Companion
https://www.amazon.com/Edible-Flowers-Companion-Kitty-Morse/dp/098521645X/ref=sr_1_1?dc
ALL downloadable on Amazon.com

Yes, even the Pope liked A Biblical Feast (via Mission San Luis Rey in Oceanside, CA) …the book is out of print. Downloadable, however


 Morocco is (almost) out of the woods. Moroccans are allowed to travel to England but we are not! One reason perhaps: Even Moroccan buses wear masks….


and in the words of WOODY ALLEN



Bismillah
Bon Appetit
and STAY SAFE

PS:
 
Si vous avez une liste de correspondants e-mail, vous pouvez faire circuler lien pour
Le Riad au Bord de l’Oued sur la page Facebook ou sur Amazon.com
https://www.facebook.com/pg/Le-Riad-au-Bord-de-lOued-110970043646415/about/?notify_field=blurb&notif_type=page_profile_completion
 
 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07YYLJX2K/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=Le+Riad+au+bord+de+l%27oued&qid=1570749667&s